Barnett's Magazine (Articles 2044)

Nothing Like A Bit Of Bedlam

Story By Johnny Pants Photos By Jack “Hit Me Again” Cofano Monday, 19 March 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 4 ]  | 
Maybe it’s just me, but I would never ever have guessed this was a theme bike. Or, would I have guessed it was a Cross Bones either. That’s two major things I never would have guessed, but guess what? I really, really love this bike built by the folks at Tobacco Road Harley-Davidson in Raleigh, North Carolina, for so many reasons from its overall one-off look to its ability to still aim for the horizon at a moment’s notice.

Bill Baumgardner's Jack Ass

Story by Buck Manning, Photos by Susan Haas Friday, 16 March 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 0 ]  | 
There are very few motorcycles I don’t like; it would probably take me a while to even think of them, as riding motorized two-wheelers is still ridiculous fun to me. Sure, some are easier, or faster, or more comfortable, or cooler to ride, but plunking my butt on a motorcycle and twisting the throttle still gives me juvenile goose bumps. Bill Baumgardner of Renton, Washington, the owner of our cover bike Jack Ass, seems to have the same affliction. Bill seemingly owns at least one of every type of motorcycle and loves them all. When it comes to Harley-Davidsons though, Bill gets downright serious, “A Harley is not a status symbol to me, you know, it’s something that’s America, something of value. The best part of riding a Harley is pulling up to a stop light and looking over at the guy in the mini-van with the wife and screaming kids and he’s like, ‘Take me with you!’ Nope, can’t go.”

Bill-Baumgardner-s-jack-ass

Written by Story by Buck Manning, Photos by Susan Haas Friday, 16 March 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 0 ]  | 
There are very few motorcycles I don’t like; it would probably take me a while to even think of them, as riding motorized two-wheelers is still ridiculous fun to me. Sure, some are easier, or faster, or more comfortable, or cooler to ride, but plunking my butt on a motorcycle and twisting the throttle still gives me juvenile goose bumps. Bill Baumgardner of Renton, Washington, the owner of our cover bike Jack Ass, seems to have the same affliction. Bill seemingly owns at least one of every type of motorcycle and loves them all. When it comes to Harley-Davidsons though, Bill gets downright serious, “A Harley is not a status symbol to me, you know, it’s something that’s America, something of value. The best part of riding a Harley is pulling up to a stop light and looking over at the guy in the mini-van with the wife and screaming kids and he’s like, ‘Take me with you!’ Nope, can’t go.”

Bill Baumgardner's Jack Ass

Story by Buck Manning, Photos by Susan Haas Friday, 16 March 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 0 ]  | 
There are very few motorcycles I don’t like; it would probably take me a while to even think of them, as riding motorized two-wheelers is still ridiculous fun to me. Sure, some are easier, or faster, or more comfortable, or cooler to ride, but plunking my butt on a motorcycle and twisting the throttle still gives me juvenile goose bumps. Bill Baumgardner of Renton, Washington, the owner of our cover bike Jack Ass, seems to have the same affliction. Bill seemingly owns at least one of every type of motorcycle and loves them all. When it comes to Harley-Davidsons though, Bill gets downright serious, “A Harley is not a status symbol to me, you know, it’s something that’s America, something of value. The best part of riding a Harley is pulling up to a stop light and looking over at the guy in the mini-van with the wife and screaming kids and he’s like, ‘Take me with you!’ Nope, can’t go.” Bill’s no stranger to custom Harleys having built a wicked cool Night Train custom, which he still owns, which had a fat front tire replacing the stock skinny hoop and that apparently set the stage for the design of this one. “I don’t want anything that someone else can just go out and buy. I want to be different. I liked the Exile fat tire look; Russell’s a bright guy. I think my bike has a similar look,” said Bill. The late famed builder and one-time owner of Downtown Harley-Davidson in Seattle, Washington, Russ Tom was a friend of Bill’s and had introduced him to a talented builder to help him with his first ground-up build, Downtown’s Brian Mitchell. Frame choice was very important as Bill had his design worked out in his head before any work ever started. “I just wanted a fat, dirt track-looking bike, nothing raked out,” said Bill. It’s not unusual for Brian to build his own frames, but when he saw the Carolina Customs rigid Bill had picked out, he said, “Lets get that.” The steep 28-degree rake was achieved by adding 2” to the top tube, but the downtube was one of Bill’s favorite features, “I really liked how it came down to that little point.” A set of stock length V-Rod forks was chosen to hang off the front, and they’re mounted in a set of Storz triple clamps that have no off-set. Brian is buddies with Steve Storz and had him send up a pair of unfinished trees, as Bill doesn’t like chrome and didn’t want to go through all the hassle of removing the hardened plating for the eventual finish he had in mind. All was not peaches and cream between those Wide Glide-width legs. “Originally I wanted to run a 200, but couldn’t get it to fit. We had to shave the inside of them to make a 180 tire fit,” said Bill. Still looks damn fat, though. A fender-less Performance Machine 18” Seville front wheel carries Dunlop rubber and a set of dual-disc four-piston PM brakes. Seems like Bill had some serious road burning in mind. Road burning would be easy with the choice of a Harley 103” Twin Cam A motor that Bill got from Brian by trading him one of his high-tech gazillion dollar mini-bikes straight across. Not the usual way to acquire a power plant, but if everyone was cool with that, so be it. Mike McNamara at DHD built the engine and Bill said, “He built a really reliable motor, he’s real conscientious.” The choice of an A motor is a little unusual in this time of aftermarket big-inch mills usually sitting between the frame rails, but horsepower is more than sufficient for this fairly light bike. As to how it works in the real world, “The only thing that really vibrates are my mirrors. With the 257 cams Mike used, it doesn’t really thump,” said Bill. The rest of the build consists of mainly raiding the Screamin’ Eagle catalog, except for a Daytona ignition and custom pipes by DHD. The exhaust started with a bazooka muffler from a tuner car that Bill got and finished with bits and pieces from a local muffler shop until they got it where they wanted. When asked to describe the sound it makes, Bill quietly said, “It’s a little loud,” and trailed off from there. BDL’s 3” open primary connects to an H-D 5-speed with a short, bent-back jockey shifter in charge of gear changes. “People ask me, ‘Why a jockey shift?’ and I tell them, ’Cause I want to.’ Yeah, it’s a challenge, but I don’t take the easy way ever,” said Bill. Power is finally delivered to the Dunlop 250-shod PM wheel by a belt. On something this simple it would appear there’d be chain final drive, but according to Bill, “I think of Harleys as air-cooled, pushrod, belt-drive twins.” So belt it is. The PM rear brake probably doesn’t see much use with the foot clutch, but it’s there if needed. The gas tank was controversial as Bill wasn’t crazy about it at first, but Brian kept modifying it until Bill was satisfied. A Carolina Customs oil tank caused no such uproar and one of their rear fenders was modified by DHD and the bodywork was done. As stated earlier, Bill’s a no-chrome guy. The frame was ceramic coated in an aluminum color along with the H-D headlight and a few other pieces while silver H-D satin finish is used elsewhere. Nothing sassy, just clean. John Dady of Blowsion in Sherwood, Oregon, shot the House of Kolor Burple paint over a chromed tank to give it depth, and also did the graphics. “The wheels were going to be blue, but didn’t match. I like the black better,” said Bill. Rich’s Upholstery in Seattle made that comfy looking seat. So after all this work and money spent, does Bill use it? “I ride it as much as I can, but if it’s wet (Seattle wet?), I can’t ride it with no front fender,” said Bill. Being the lone-wolf rogue that I know he is, I think he’d just go faster.   SPECIFICATIONS: Owner: Bill Baumgardner Year / Make: 2006 Rigid. Fabrication/ Assembly: Downtown Harley (DHD) Build time: One year Engine: 103" H-D Twin Cam A Heads: Screamin' Eagle CNC Ported Cam: Screamin' Eagle 257's Ignition: Daytona Carb: Screamin' Eagle 51mm CV Pipes: DHD Air Cleaner: H-D Screamin' Eagle Transmission: H-D 5-speed Jockey Primary: 3" Open BDL Clutch: BDL Frame: Carolina Custom Rake: 28-degrees Stretch: 2" in the top tube Fork: V-Rod 49mm/ Storz Clamps Additional rake in trees: Nope Wheels: PM Seville Front Tire: Dunlop 180/55/18 Rear Tire: Dunlop 250/40/18 Brakes: PM 4-piston Fuel Tank: DHD Oil Tank: DHD/ Carolina Custom Fenders: DHD/ Carolina Customs Handlebars: Flat track Risers: Storz Headlight: H-D Taillight: Joker Machine Hand Controls: H-D H-D Grips: Foot Controls: DHD Electrical: DHD Paint/ graphics: John Dady/ Blowsion Color: House of Kolors Burple over chrome Seat: Rich's Upholstery Special thanks to: Russell Tom, He left this world too early. Susan Haas, Brian Mitchell, Mike Mac, Beth Patrick, Rick Tom, John Dady, and Jimmy.   This bike feature originally appeared in Barnett's Magazine issue #54, March-April 2007. Builder: Bill Baumgardner Builders come in all shapes, sizes, skill levels, and especially personalities. Bill Baumgardner is not your typical builder in that he’s not the guy who grabs some steel tubing and rearranges the molecules to start his build, but rather knows what he wants from a finished custom and works out beforehand how to get there. This is not as simple as it might seem to someone who hasn’t done a ground-up custom built through other people. I think Glenn Bartels encapsulated this idea the best in his Hot Rod Hawg feature in our last issue when he said, “Hey. I’m not a welder, but I know how to find a guy to do it.” Bill did the same and hooked up with some of the best talents available to make his dream a reality. It’s not that he didn’t get his hands dirty on this project. Working closely with Downtown Harley’s Brian Mitchell and Mike McNamara, he pitched in and did what he already knew mechanically and learned even more for future projects. Bill’s background of a long career in tool services at Boeing in Seattle working on planes from the old 727s to everything built since has given him a mechanical background to pull from. His two-wheeled interest started with bicycles as a kid and grew to seriously competing in motocross in the northwest. His two-stroke life changed to big V-twins after experiencing the pleasure of riding rental Harleys in Hawaii and finally smelling the roses, so to speak. He still finds time to give his garage full of dirt bikes, sportbikes, and twin Harley customs a good workout.

Klock Werks "FXRV"

Story by Mark Barnett and photos by Kevin Eilbeck Wednesday, 14 March 2018 Comments [ 6 ] Gallery [ 24 ]  | 
“I can’t believe it’s a V-Rod,” is something that Greg Wick and Brian Klock have been hearing a lot lately when showing off their latest collaboration, which Brian named the FXRV. 

TT Cycles: Triumph Coffee Bike

Story by Buck Manning, Photos by Scott Venetelli Tuesday, 13 March 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 44 ]  | 
There’s an interesting phenomena taking place with the “average Harley riders” I personally know which involves getting a second bike to supplement their Road King/Ultra daily rider. As a group, they’ve all gotten up early for work the past 30 years or so before retiring and still do, habits like that are nearly impossible to break. Now, all dressed up and no place to have to go, they like to get together for breakfast daily and chat over eggs about who knows what. Apparently pulling that bagger out of the garage and riding a few miles to the local hangout is a bit of a hassle though. What was formerly called a bar hopper is now being coveted by these early retirement guys as a “go to coffee bike.” My long time friend, Okie, has been on a search for his ultimate going to coffee bike, one that’s light, agile, affordable, and special in its own way, everything his Casper the Ghost Ultra is not. Although he’s a diehard H-D guy, Okie’s always had a roving eye for British machinery since his teens and the period correct looking Triumph custom by TT Cycles of Berkeley Heights, New Jersey, just might be the ticket to have parked outside his favorite Cape Cod hash house.

Rick’s Motorcycles’ Dirty Thirty

Story by Peter LaFrance Photos by David “Captain Slick” Hayes & Rick’s Motorcycles Friday, 09 March 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 60 ]  | 
   Some guys just seem to have it all and Patrick “Rick” Knoerzer is definitely one of those guys as far as I’m concerned. Rick not only owns one of the most beautiful Harley-Davidson dealerships in the world, but he also owns his own custom shop where he makes his own dreams come true. I’ve gotta be sure to add that Rick’s got a constant flow of motorcycle dreams and he does whatever he has to making sure they become a reality. And I’m not talking bolting on some factory or aftermarket parts and a non-stock paintjob. No sir! Rick’s Motorcycles GmbH is a manufacturer of custom Harley parts you’d sell a kidney for.

Unnaturally Aspirated Softail

Story By Johnny Pants Photos By Jack “Turbo Lad” Cofano Thursday, 08 March 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 5 ]  | 
Lately there’s been a return to wholesome natural foods and it probably is a good thing although we’ve got to wait a generation or two to see if it’s actually true. I won’t be part of this social experiment as I like my food unnatural and my bikes the same way. All it took was one ride on a turbo’d Harley and I was sold on the wholesome goodness of excessive horsepower courtesy of unnatural aspiration. That was the healthiest Harley-Davidson I had ever ridden so I rest my case of regular old nature versus forced induction. Yeah, it may not be good, so the experts say, to stuff yourself, but stuffing your Twin Cam engine with turbo is excellent and good for you too.

When 284hp Is Just Not Enough

Story By Jake Blake Photos By Jack “I Thought Once Was Never Enough” Cofano Tuesday, 06 March 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 6 ]  | 
    Man, featuring one outrageously cool Azzkikr custom bagger after another is getting to be such a regular thing here at Barnett’s Magazine Online that we either should send Azzkikr’s Len Edmondson a bill for advertising or, just change our name to Azzkikr Fanboys Online. I guess that’s what happens when you can’t not feature a bike from a builder you’ve done many times before. Of course, the reason that happens so often is that Len keeps turning out custom baggers that are not only beautiful and extremely well built, but engineering masterpieces. Plus he loves his horsepower and that counts for a lot to us. Crazy cool and crazy quick always grabs our attention every time ─ especially when it’s done tastefully.

Corbin FXR Warbird

Story and photos by Rodent Monday, 05 March 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 12 ]  | 
To true Harley-Davidson aficionados, the FXR, FXRT, and FXRP represent the best bikes to come out of the minds at Juneau Ave, in Milwaukee since the Evolution revolution of 1983. The cops rode them. The Hells Angels swore by them. And, Harley stopped building them. Some say that they interfered with the smooth running of the assembly line because of the fitment of the motor into the frame.

The Devil’s In The Details

Story By Johnny Pants Photos By Jack “El Foto Diablo” Cofano Friday, 02 March 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 15 ]  | 
 My first quick look at this bobber didn’t catch what was going on past the Viper green paint and the basic outline of this build. But, my second look sure did and there’s a whole lot of stuff going on everywhere you look. If you still keep looking there’s even more. If you like Old School mixed with some early Arlen Ness-ness, this beautiful bobber is for you. If it’s not your cup of tea, that’s cool, but check out the photos as there’s something going on “everywhere you look.”

Bob Harten’s Fat Boy in Copper

By Jeff Spicoli Photos by Jack “No, you’re the fat boy” Cofano Thursday, 01 March 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 12 ]  | 
   Everybody wants their bike to standout in a crowd. These days you have a lot of choices as to what style or type of bike to begin with and where you go from there depends on your imagination, talent, and wallet. Maybe you’ve only got one bike and downtime is not just something you can put up with as downtime actually means no riding. Let’s face it, for most mortals, a ground-up build just ain’t gonna happen while modifying a bagger to current big wheel standards requires the bags to be filled to the brim with moolah and then refilled again later to finish it.

General Lee’s Hooligan Dyna

Story By Emile Berube Photos By Jack “I’ve Got Hooligan Blood” Cofano Monday, 26 February 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 8 ]  | 
   Everybody who rides a Harley-Davidson has a bit of a hooligan in their DNA, some more than others. Just riding a motorcycle puts you in a so-called “daredevil” category to different degrees and even the motorcycle you ride says something about how much of a true hooligan you really are. For instance, a nice bagger with loud pipes says you’ve got a bit of your inner hooligan in play, but something lighter and more agile like a Sportster or a Dyna that’s been hopped up a bit says “I’m all about hooliganism.” For any of you that might be offended by the term hooligan, then just think of yourself as a ruffian ─ same thing, different word.

You Want Long And Low? You Got It!

Story By Tyler Durden Photos By Jack “Short And Low” Cofano Friday, 23 February 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 4 ]  | 
Every year our roving photographer and man about town, Jack Cofano, takes a trip to Las Vegas to cover the Artistry in Iron Show. Every year he comes back with some of the wildest motorcycle creations on earth, but unfortunately a lot of them aren’t Harley-Davidsons so the interest from our readers out there is pretty small compared to what’s parked outside. Checking out the parking spots is a lot harder than doing the show for Jack as he has to really beat-feet to cover the huge area surrounding the show. But, sometimes it’s where the best bikes are found.

If Hef Only Knew

By Jeff Spicoli Photos by Jack “Believe Me He Does” Cofano Thursday, 22 February 2018 Comments [ 0 ] Gallery [ 10 ]  | 
  Someone’s figured out how to combine two of the things we love way too much into one pink and black bagger. No, no, not custom motorcycles and rock n’ roll as is usually the combo case. This time it’s custom motorcycles and, well, I think you know where this is headed if you’ve checked out Jack Cofano’s photo gallery or maybe spent a little time checking out Mr. Hefner’s magazine photos over the years. Apparently Jermaine Chandler of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, did and he’s not the least bit afraid to put his money where his brain is.