One of the most overused and incorrectly used terms regarding custom motorcycles is “chopper.” People often refer to any custom Harley as a chopper so much so that it’s kinda lost its meaning. Many have tried to define exactly what makes a bike a chopper, but it’s always an open debate with no final definition from what I’ve seen, read, and heard. Me? I kinda take the approach that the late Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart took when he had to rule on what was pornography way back in 1964 and said, “I know it when I see it.” Perfecto. I’ve never bothered to think or argue about what makes a motorcycle a chopper, but I know one when I see it.
Published in Choppers
  Okay, okay, back to a bit of Harley reality with this fetching rendition of Jim Bortles’ take on a Sportster that willingly trespasses on Harley-Davidson’s recent highly successful Dark Custom series, but with a twist of brass. Actually, that’s a misnomer as Harley is the one who’s trespassing on a look that pro and amateur builders have been doing for years. Yes, Harley did capitalize on murdering out their various models to bring them in line with the hipsters, but builders like Jim Bortles, owner of The Chopper Farm in Waxhaw, North Carolina, are always way ahead of the production bike curve and this Sporty is just one more example. Dark and brassy always has its own appeal and you have to admit this 2002 Sporty wears it well.  
Published in Modified Stockers
   Sometimes you don’t really know a guy, but sometimes you just gotta like and respect a guy when he just keeps dropping a new facet of himself on you that yu never suspected and it’s somehow always interesting. Delbert Soucier Jr. of Fayetteville, North Carolina, is just one of those guys. Calm, cool, unassuming, dryly funny as hell, imaginative in both practical and artistic ways while being the owner of Mutiny Cycle Works and having a full-time day job as a Senior Estimator at a rather large construction company, Delbert’s been an extremely interesting and instantly likable guy from the first time we spoke years ago. The boy just wants to have fun and will absolutely work his butt off to do it. When it comers to building one-off, ground-up motorcycles, you gotta respect Delbert’s hard work and his imagination that refuses to be reigned in or restricted by a strict budget. Remember, a successful estimator is an imaginative estimator.
Published in Bobbers
Couldn’t take your eyeballs off this striking Sporty could you? Don’t feel bad as that’s the reaction anybody who’s seen this bike has had including a few people I know that could give a rat’s hat (I don’t know if they wear hats, but I’m not supposed to say ass. Oops, I said it anyway.) about motorcycles. It’s just so absolutely clean and crisp even my neighbor who doesn’t just not like, but hates motorcycles thought that it was “good looking” when he saw it on my screen. Yup, builder Tim Firstenberger of Little Comfort Customs in Sarasota, Florida, has delivered one of those BAM! bikes that has the potential to garner admiring looks in spite of it not being some mega-million dollar custom.
Published in Modified Stockers
   Whaddya do when you’ve got a 1956 Harley Panhead and transmission lying around? That’s a question most of us would like to be stuck with and every answer is good. You could restore it back to its natural as-delivered state and right now that’s getting to be a bigger thing than ever with the rising auction prices for restored motorcycles. Or, you could do as people have done for decades and decades and chop the living hell out of it.
Published in Ultra Customs
   John Stanley of Leland, North Carolina, got to do what many of us can only fantasize about. Doing something totally unexpected for good ol’ dad like finishing the bike he never quite got around to building. But first, there’s a little history involved as to how this all came about. “I was raised on motorcycles, custom cars and hot rods [be sure to check out the photo gallery for some very cool old photos of John and his dad]. When I was a kid I had dirt bikes and we had the FLH and another Harley FL which was an old police bike,” said John. “The bike started out as my dad’s 1976 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide with the standard 74” Shovelhead with drag pipes and an Electron carb. My dad, Butch Stanley, ended up with an injury and the FLH, after a few rounds of tequila, ended up sitting for five years in about five boxes under a tarp with the intent of rebuilding it until the late ‘90s when I talked my dad into selling it to me.”
Published in Bobbers