And, if you don’t believe this bagger is the King of Bling, there’s proof written on the bike at least seven times. There’s a point be made here by our mystery owner and I’m not bothering to dispute it. It says “King of Bling” seven times and whoever built this built this to be the bling king. And, if it’s on the Internet it must be true.
Published in Baggers
   When somebody mentions “custom Panhead” the first image that comes to mind is retro chopper with all the fixings like a chrome springer, peanut tank, apes, sissy bar, extrovert exhaust, and a dazzling paintjob involving many different techniques before the final pinstripe is laid on. But that’s all in the extremely recent past after I took a peek through the Jack Cofano-supplied photo gallery accompanying this article. This is one sexy café racer/street tracker/drag racer hot rod of a Harley-Davidson Panhead. I just love this bike and am not afraid to state that even though it probably falls out of the spectrum of what Panhead freaks lean towards.
Published in Bobbers
   Harley-Davidson Flatheads are what a lot of people might say is an acquired taste much like gin, Moxie, and OnYums. It might not be love at first ride for those used to the power of late model Harleys, but there’s something about the old 45-inch Flatheads that makes for a satisfying experience. Yeah they sound like a Harley should, but they’ve got their own beat and bark that’s a bit more relaxed in tempo. They are a 45-degree air-cooled V-twin, but they look so different you’d never mistake one for any other Harley design even though the very basic engine architecture is the same. Flatty’s are a simple side-valve design from a time when simple was a motorcycling necessity for riders who were usually their own mechanics.
Published in Bobbers
  Back in 1973 I got a frantic call from my buddy Randy Costa to get over to his body shop immediately ─ no excuses! All he said was to toot my horn when I parked, stay with my car and be ready to be amazed. Randy was always full of surprises so without hesitating other than to find my keys, I hopped into my ’59 Bug and got over there as fast as 36hp could get you there. Pulling up to his shop, I couldn’t help but notice it was odd that his double-sized garage door facing the street was closed on a hot summer day. Shops barely had fans in them then never mind air conditioning and I couldn’t remember seeing it closed other than at night or in winter.
Published in Trikes, Etc.
  Spend any time on Barnett’s Facebook page? Well if you do you’ve probably already seen the video of Amanda Bolton expertly wheeling her big wheel bagger around like it was a minibike. Man, did Jack Cofano’s video post really brought on the hits, likes and brought out the comments. Most were positive, but a lot were needlessly nasty. Hey, as my mother, always used to fall back on, “If you haven’t got anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all.” But, there’s always going to be the Interweb’s (thank you Gas Monkey’s Richard Rawlings) negatorious keyboard commandos who like to point out the obvious like the rest of us are living in a brain fog.
Published in Baggers
   Somewhere in the small town of Duncan, South Carolina, there’s a newly-built small garage spewing bright arcs of plasma light through the dead of night until the wee hours of the morning. No, there are no crazy science experiments going on, at least in the conventional sense. This steel structure is busy spitting out cutting edge machines that look like the work of a mad scientist intent on mutating Harley-Davidson’s finest baggers into something The Motor Company could never produce without sending a coven of attorneys in a crazed frenzy. Finally when the sun is closer to rising than not, the lights go out and out steps a young guy named Jason Kurtz who has to get some sleep before he heads to his day job at a body shop. Ah, the life of the hardcore garage builder.
Published in Baggers
  Like we’ve said many times before at Barnett’s Magazine Online, not every bike we feature is an over-the-top custom and there’s a good reason for that. A cool bike is a cool bike no matter how elaborate or not the build is. Some of us here favor the more outlandish bikes while some of us (actually, I’m only speaking for myself, but then I have an unwarranted, but high opinion of myself) favor the more traditional customized showroom models of The Motor Company. This lovely-in-white 2003 Harley-Davidson Heritage Softail owned by Billy Sharp of Central City, Kentucky, is a perfect example of this mildly modified bike.
Published in Modified Stockers
   Everybody’s got their favorite style of custom Harley-Davidson whether it’s a Shovelhead bobber or an outrageous big wheel bagger. As Jack Cofano promised last week when he laid out two days of Daytona’s no-bag bikes for you to peruse, Barnett’s Magazine Online is presenting two days of Daytona’s most extreme baggers for your viewing pleasure.
Published in 2015 Events
   Everybody’s got their favorite style of custom Harley-Davidson whether it’s a Shovelhead bobber or an outrageous big wheel bagger. As Jack Cofano promised last week when he laid out two days of Daytona’s no-bag bikes for you to peruse, Barnett’s Magazine Online is presenting two days of Daytona’s most extreme baggers for your viewing pleasure.
Published in 2015 Events
   Thinking about building a modern custom bagger with a big wheel and all the trappings but maybe you’re just a little freaked out at the idea of cutting and welding your Motor Company frame? Well sit down and take a deep breath and relax a bit because Joey Beam, owner of Vindictive Wayz in Rutherfordton, North Carolina, has your back. His 2009 Harley-Davidson Road King sports a 26-inch wheel up front like the trendiest of baggers, but there’s something quite different going on to how he got there. Let’s just hit it right up front and state that no frame tubes were cut in making this bike.
Published in Baggers
Page 1 of 5

MOTORCYCLE SEARCH [ 493 BIKES ]

SEARCH BY STOCKNUMBER


MOTORCYCLE CATEGORIES