Sometimes it doesn’t take too much to lose interest in checking out a chopper. Could be a color you hate or a style you don’t care for or maybe just finding out what you thought was something is not that something at all. There’s also a good chance finding the deep, dark secret doesn’t mean a thing to you either. I think that’s exactly the case you’re looking at here. 
Published in Bobbers
Like I said, horses are none of my business. I grew up in a horse family with a father who obsessed over them. He spent a lot of time around them as a kid including pre-Depression stints of driving a horse-pulled ice wagon and another delivering coal. As a young kid he tried to pass that obsession onto me, but I didn’t want anything to do with an animal that had to turn back and look at you in the saddle with each eye to make sure it was seeing what the other eye did. I didn’t trust them then and I still feel the same way today.
Published in Choppers
So I’m watching an online auto auction on TV when the parade of Camaros and Mustangs is broken up by a chopper rolling up to the block. It was long, low, with a wicked rake and was a big name build (that shall remain nameless) that was in perfect shape with not a scratch and less than a thousand miles on the odometer. It had every piece of trick git from the year (2007) it was built, wasn’t a silly theme bike, and looked quite usable as is or a great platform to modify to current tastes. It sold for eight grand. Basically, that covered the price of the finished and dolled-up S&S engine with all the other stuff thrown in for free.
Published in Ultra Customs
  Chopper shops have a history of naming the business like it’s a challenge to your manliness, you know, tough guy names. Hey, I’m not going to call anybody out just in case that’s really true and they want their bit of retribution (from my point of view, anybody’s tougher than I am). Whether they’re tough or threatening is beside the point when it comes to really fabricating a bike. Expertise and skill wins out over being a bad boy builder. Maybe that’s why I like the name of Cristian Sosa’s shop in Las Vegas called Sosa Metalworks. That simple name says it all without any latent threats to your body or your ego involved. Cristian works in metal and works it extremely well.  
Published in Bobbers
   Jeremy Valentine is one talented guy. Really talented. All you have to do is take a look at his version of a modern day board tracker that’s made to hit the streets as well as the show circuit and you can see he’s got it going on from tip to toe. Clean is the operative word here with nothing that catches my eye that shouldn’t.
Published in Bobbers
   Man-oh-man, if there was ever a trike I would not want to be caught in the rain in, it’s this ode to shiny metal trike built by Steve Stirewalt of Dirt & Street Cycle in lovely Rockwell, North Carolina. Get this trike wet and dirty and I’d end up buying my MOTHER’S chrome polish in gallon buckets instead of eight-ounce bottles. Geez Louise, that’s a lot of chromed square-footage on three wheels.
Published in Trikes, Etc.
Long before the internet became the information highway of today, television was the highway of our dreams. Many of us got our love of unfamiliar asphalt from shows like the revered, but tacky ‘Then Came Bronson’ starring Michael Parks and his magical, morphing Sportster. There were many others and I’m sure you have yours.
Published in Choppers
Nothing says more about a builder than what he’s built for himself. Sure there are builders that might just hop on one of their wild and whacky-doodle spec bikes if they have to take an occasional ride, but for the builder who hasn’t forgotten his roots and still enjoys riding for the sake of riding, their personal ride really tells all you need to know. Bill Schalk of Spitfire Customs in Hamilton, Ohio, falls into the latter category with his Kandy Green budget street bomber called Youth ‘n Wisdom. “I truly love to ride, if it’s not raining, I’m riding my bike. We try to build bikes differently than what a lot of guys in the area do. We try not to overdo it,” said Bill. “I’m so used to seeing all the long bikes in the area like the Big Dogs and American IronHorses and stuff like that. I wanted to do something short and fat, and something that had a lot of power.” Taking a glance at the finished product, there’s no doubt that for Bill, fat is where it’s at.
Published in Bobbers