I was working in my shop today when I found an old 35 mm film container full of tiny instrument bulbs in my tool box from who knows where and when. I remember when these plastic containers were my go-to holder of all small things from master clips to cotter pins to whatever. Somehow they had all disappeared but this one, but as I held it in my hand I felt a tinge of nostalgia for the days when I was swamped with these things from taking photos. Man, digital photography sure has taken over and I’m not even sure if Kodak is still in business. All of this made me wonder how many film containers our man about town, Barnett’s Magazine Online’s chief lens men must have used back in the day. Thousands and thousands would be my guess, but where are all those film containers now? 
Published in Modified Stockers
   Sometimes the story going on behind a motorcycle build is just about as interesting as a beautiful build. Take this retro-modern 1998 Harley-Davidson built by Prism Supply Co. for instance. It’s a clean build using relatively modern bits to make an Old School statement without trying to be the poster bike for that period. When I look at it I see the silhouette of custom bikes that I saw being actively ridden on the street back in the day more than any radical Arlen Ness creation you saw in magazines. In making a more timely reference, it’s more Billy Bike than Captain America and I always liked Billy’s better anyway. It’s a classic chopper profile that’s probably close to what somebody might draw if they were told to sketch a chopper. It’s a nice modern ride with historical style points as part of the deal.
Published in Bobbers
  I’m stymied. I’m completely stymied. Just when I think I’ve got a handle on things, it all changes. At least that’s what’s going on when I checked out this bike built by Chris Eder, owner of Misfit Industries in Addison, Texas. Misfit is at the leading edge of custom bagger building in the USA with a steady stream of parts and builds that are able to find their own path in a forest of custom shops catering to what’s hot and hopefully avoiding what’s not. Right off, I’ll admit I’m an unabashed fan of, well, everything I’ve seen come out of that shop located 15 miles due north of Dallas. I’m still stymied, though.
Published in Choppers
   Going by the number of likes a radical chop like this one gets on our Facebook page, this should put it right over the top. As much as everything is bagger this and bagger that nowadays, there’s still a hardcore lot of Barnett’s Magazine Online’s readers who love the stuff that made TV choppers big on the early to middle 2000s. Much like what’s happened to custom baggers today, there’s an unwritten formula behind the madness that makes radical rides like this baby something that many of you dream of ultimately owning if only the stars would align.
Published in Ultra Customs
   For the record, I’ve never met, spoken with, emailed, Facebooked, Twittered or dabbled in Morse Code with the owner of this snake-driven Pro Street, Serge Seguin, but I think I know a couple of things about him personally. One is that he loves his custom pro street motorcycles and two, he seems to have a serious thing about snakes. I’d like to think that his only criteria for this ground-up build by Steve and Mike Lebreton of Speed-Trix in Saint-Andre'- d' Argenteuil, Quebec, Canada, was ─ (1) A Pro Street-style motorcycle. (2) Vibrant green paint and (3) Snakes as far as the eye could see and then some.  If those were his actual criteria, Speed-Trix nailed it.
Published in Ultra Customs
    Striking piece of work isn’t it? Yes sir, it’s one of those bikes that grab you whether you’re a fan (hopefully) like me or one of those full-time Internet haters (we all know you’re lustfully and jealously staring). Maybe this isn’t something you’d want to ride across Texas, but it sure is a looker from any angle and that’s what makes custom bikes special in their own way.
Published in Pro-Street
  Everybody’s got a favorite style of custom motorcycle and the old tried and true bobbers of today are possibly my favorite style of custom to actually get on and go. Oh I love looking at anything custom even if I don’t enjoy hoping on board and actually riding it as a motorcycle without excuse after excuse being necessary. The basic layout of what’s construed as a modern bobber is my favorite simply because they are always fun to ride if they haven’t been taken to some show-shocking extreme.
Published in Bobbers
   Some people are hopeless romantics and some people are successful romantics. There are some people who are both and Curt Owen, owner of Anything Goes in Mulberry, Indiana, is one of those lucky few. After a 25-year career in high-end woodworking, he turned his back on it and went into a completely different line of work involving his passion for anything motorcycle. “I figured if I can bend wood, I can bend metal,” said Curt and with that, Anything Goes went from an idea to a full-time business specializing in custom oil tanks for Harleys, BSAs, Triumphs, CB 750s, and one-off customs 
Published in Pro-Street
   Who woulda thunk that of all the builders out there, the likeably irascible John Dodson of Gangster Choppers in Richmond, Virginia, would be the guy making choppers for kids of all things? Not me, that’s for sure as John is one of those truly hardcore bike guys who doesn’t just live the lifestyle cause it’s a cool thing to do, but is the lifestyle through and through. He’s his own guy with his own opinions, take it or leave it, and that’s what you gotta love about him. He builds what he wants with absolutely no regard for what’s trendy or in at the moment and he’s made a successful business out of it. He’s a chopper guy through and through and I’d never ever have the balls to ask him to build me a big wheel bagger unless I was looking for a swift kick in the ass before I was directed to the nearest door of his shop. Buy building bikes for kids? Can’t be true, can it?  
Published in Modified Stockers
   Okay, okay, we’ve written a ton of articles on John Dodson of Gangster Choppers in Richmond, Virginia, and that’s because he turns out one kick ass chopper after another like he’s got chopper elves locked in his cellar. John’s range of styles runs all over the place with one show winning chop after another. But, they’re always a chopper, not a bagger and that’s fine by me.
Published in Choppers
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