Not every bike we feature has to be over the top or slightly beyond. Custom bikes that get you jonesing to start ‘em up and ride the hell out of ‘em after a quick look are what a lot of riders are looking for even if they don’t know it. There are bikes you can’t help but stare at and admire the workmanship and imagination that went into them. Then there are those others that just hit all the right buttons and make you want to ride them. This nicely customized late model Harley-Davidson Softail is one of the latter. 
Published in Modified Stockers
  One thing I love doing is perusing Barnett Magazine Online’s photo gallery filled with shutterbug Jack Cofano’s photo galleries. It’s fun to cruise through and see bike after gorgeous bike of all different styles and that makes it a bit daunting to choose one for an article. I always end up picking something that fits my mood at the moment more than anything. Sometimes it’s just on sheer looks alone like a paintjob that’s so striking I can’t stop looking at it while lots of bikes get to me because they look like fun to ride. Today my pick is really influenced by a week of rainy weather that makes me giddy to get on a bike and do some riding. Actually just some cruising around and hopefully enjoy the supposedly sunny and warm weather ahead.  
Published in Modified Stockers
Yeah, I’m completely aware there are no rules for custom motorcycles, but there are surely categories of bikes that usually require certain standards like baggers with air suspension, non-stock bodywork, wicked audio systems, and, of course, big front wheels. Sometimes, though, a bike comes along that doesn’t fit into any of our so-called standards and kinda makes me wonder what the builder was going for. But, it becomes instantly clear that what the builder was going for was a custom motorcycle, his custom motorcycle and all the easily fallen into categories be damned. 
Published in Baggers
I was working in my shop today when I found an old 35 mm film container full of tiny instrument bulbs in my tool box from who knows where and when. I remember when these plastic containers were my go-to holder of all small things from master clips to cotter pins to whatever. Somehow they had all disappeared but this one, but as I held it in my hand I felt a tinge of nostalgia for the days when I was swamped with these things from taking photos. Man, digital photography sure has taken over and I’m not even sure if Kodak is still in business. All of this made me wonder how many film containers our man about town, Barnett’s Magazine Online’s chief lens men must have used back in the day. Thousands and thousands would be my guess, but where are all those film containers now? 
Published in Modified Stockers
   Sometimes the story going on behind a motorcycle build is just about as interesting as a beautiful build. Take this retro-modern 1998 Harley-Davidson built by Prism Supply Co. for instance. It’s a clean build using relatively modern bits to make an Old School statement without trying to be the poster bike for that period. When I look at it I see the silhouette of custom bikes that I saw being actively ridden on the street back in the day more than any radical Arlen Ness creation you saw in magazines. In making a more timely reference, it’s more Billy Bike than Captain America and I always liked Billy’s better anyway. It’s a classic chopper profile that’s probably close to what somebody might draw if they were told to sketch a chopper. It’s a nice modern ride with historical style points as part of the deal.
Published in Bobbers
  I’m stymied. I’m completely stymied. Just when I think I’ve got a handle on things, it all changes. At least that’s what’s going on when I checked out this bike built by Chris Eder, owner of Misfit Industries in Addison, Texas. Misfit is at the leading edge of custom bagger building in the USA with a steady stream of parts and builds that are able to find their own path in a forest of custom shops catering to what’s hot and hopefully avoiding what’s not. Right off, I’ll admit I’m an unabashed fan of, well, everything I’ve seen come out of that shop located 15 miles due north of Dallas. I’m still stymied, though.
Published in Choppers
   Going by the number of likes a radical chop like this one gets on our Facebook page, this should put it right over the top. As much as everything is bagger this and bagger that nowadays, there’s still a hardcore lot of Barnett’s Magazine Online’s readers who love the stuff that made TV choppers big on the early to middle 2000s. Much like what’s happened to custom baggers today, there’s an unwritten formula behind the madness that makes radical rides like this baby something that many of you dream of ultimately owning if only the stars would align.
Published in Ultra Customs
   For the record, I’ve never met, spoken with, emailed, Facebooked, Twittered or dabbled in Morse Code with the owner of this snake-driven Pro Street, Serge Seguin, but I think I know a couple of things about him personally. One is that he loves his custom pro street motorcycles and two, he seems to have a serious thing about snakes. I’d like to think that his only criteria for this ground-up build by Steve and Mike Lebreton of Speed-Trix in Saint-Andre'- d' Argenteuil, Quebec, Canada, was ─ (1) A Pro Street-style motorcycle. (2) Vibrant green paint and (3) Snakes as far as the eye could see and then some.  If those were his actual criteria, Speed-Trix nailed it.
Published in Ultra Customs
    Striking piece of work isn’t it? Yes sir, it’s one of those bikes that grab you whether you’re a fan (hopefully) like me or one of those full-time Internet haters (we all know you’re lustfully and jealously staring). Maybe this isn’t something you’d want to ride across Texas, but it sure is a looker from any angle and that’s what makes custom bikes special in their own way.
Published in Pro-Street
  Everybody’s got a favorite style of custom motorcycle and the old tried and true bobbers of today are possibly my favorite style of custom to actually get on and go. Oh I love looking at anything custom even if I don’t enjoy hoping on board and actually riding it as a motorcycle without excuse after excuse being necessary. The basic layout of what’s construed as a modern bobber is my favorite simply because they are always fun to ride if they haven’t been taken to some show-shocking extreme.
Published in Bobbers
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