Sometimes you gotta spend money to make money or at least that’s what we’ve been led to believe. Somewhere there’s a line we always cross investing gobs of time and money into those loveable Harley-Davidson V-twins, but that’s because we’re seeing red whenever we want to change something to make it, you know, a little more personal. That’s fine for us, but I remember some of the dealership trade-ins I wouldn’t have personally touched with a ten-foot pole. A dealer’s gotta do what a dealer’s gotta do to make a buck and try and keep the customers happy.
Published in Modified Stockers
  Never saw this one coming did ya? Nope, neither did I. But, I’m sure glad Patrick “Rick” Knoerzer took the bull by the horns, in this case, Harley’s lovable fat-tired Forty-Eight and gave it a makeover featuring even lovably fatter tires. Oh there’s a lot more to this cool custom Sporty fresh out of Rick’s Motorcycles GmbH in Baden-Baden, Germany, than just bigger and more aggressive tires. Matter of fact there’s a long list of changes front to back and this bad boy Sportster with dirty intentions is a fun way to showcase them. Hey, just take a look in the photo gallery of Rick breaking the tire loose in the dirt at speed and tell me this bike doesn’t look like fun. Go ahead ─ I dare you!
Published in Modified Stockers
Once a year Carolina Harley-Davidson Buell has their in-house custom fabrication department build a completely custom bike. The custom build helps show that the Gastonia, North Carolina, based shop (located about 20 minutes west of Charlotte) can do more than just bolt-on H-D branded parts and it exposes the public to the custom fabrication they’re capable of. Jim Bortles is the sole man in charge of managing that division of the shop, plus he’s the one that performs all the welding and fabricating for it as well.
Published in Bobbers
One of the most fascinating aspects of the current musclecar craze is the occasional “phantom” car that was built as someone’s interpretation of a model the factory should have made, but didn’t. I’m not referring to cloning, like a pedestrian six-cylinder Barracuda that miraculously becomes a Hemi ‘Cuda, that’s done all the time. What I’m referring to is taking the platform of one vehicle, the engine of another, various factory pieces to make it really special, and throwing it in a blender (so to speak) until a production-style model that never existed, but could have, is created. For me that’s a black ’69 Nova Z28 powered by a lightly de-tuned ZL1 engine. The handling and four wheel discs of the Camaro Trans Am platform and a big-inch aluminum torque monster with the weight of a small block all wrapped up in a stealthy, production-looking coupe that could still bring the groceries home. Done right, a phantom car can make you doubt your eyes and your memory.
Published in Modified Stockers