You know you learn something everyday whether you want to or not. Today, surprisingly, it was something I guess I should have known considering it involves adult beverages. I enjoy a good James Bond martini from time to time and occasionally I’ll ask for it “dirty” which just means adding a bit of olive juice to the mix for a different flavor. I never thought about it much as I just pour some straight out of the jar the olives came in. But, here’s where it gets tricky, in a bar, they have bottles of just olive juice minus the olives.
Published in Bobbers
     You look at this lovely FXR and you’ve gotta think, there’s a guy that knew exactly what he wanted and didn’t take any shortcuts to get there. It had to be completely usable as an everyday rider or vying for awards at big custom shows. Even though it’s undeniably a Harley-Davidson FXR there’s basically nothing that wasn’t modded, replaced or changed in some little, but significant way. Maybe it’s not your cup of tea exactly, but it sure is Mark Hendrix’s and that’s all that matters.
Published in Modified Stockers
I was working in my shop today when I found an old 35 mm film container full of tiny instrument bulbs in my tool box from who knows where and when. I remember when these plastic containers were my go-to holder of all small things from master clips to cotter pins to whatever. Somehow they had all disappeared but this one, but as I held it in my hand I felt a tinge of nostalgia for the days when I was swamped with these things from taking photos. Man, digital photography sure has taken over and I’m not even sure if Kodak is still in business. All of this made me wonder how many film containers our man about town, Barnett’s Magazine Online’s chief lens men must have used back in the day. Thousands and thousands would be my guess, but where are all those film containers now? 
Published in Modified Stockers
  I’m stymied. I’m completely stymied. Just when I think I’ve got a handle on things, it all changes. At least that’s what’s going on when I checked out this bike built by Chris Eder, owner of Misfit Industries in Addison, Texas. Misfit is at the leading edge of custom bagger building in the USA with a steady stream of parts and builds that are able to find their own path in a forest of custom shops catering to what’s hot and hopefully avoiding what’s not. Right off, I’ll admit I’m an unabashed fan of, well, everything I’ve seen come out of that shop located 15 miles due north of Dallas. I’m still stymied, though.
Published in Choppers
   You’re looking at a rare beast. Yes it’s another example of a custom big wheel bagger with all the right stuff to compete in shows or just show off at a local watering hole, but with what I consider a major difference. Oh, if you look closely to find what I’m muttering on about, you’ve totally missed the point. It’s as simple a difference as it is a major difference and it probably wouldn’t apply to anything else but a custom bagger. Hey, I’ll stop the crap and get right to it. Here’s a hint, a strong hint, it’s the paint.
Published in Baggers
  There seems to be no gray area, no middle ground when it comes to radical custom baggers. Over the years we’ve watched bagger front wheels grow from a 21-inch size that seemed pretty damn radical when a stock Harley-Davidson bagger came with a massive 16-inch front wheel. Would it handle? Would there be any downsides? Well, before you knew it, there was a 23, then a 26 and finally a 30-inch front wheel. Phew! That’s a big jump in a relatively short time. But wait, there’s more ─ just when you think it’s over, along comes a 32-incher. Is it finally over?
Published in Baggers
   Well the New Year’s here and I hope you had a lovely celebration including stories that will be told over family holiday dinners for years to come. But, it’s time to get back to counting the days until spring (my life partner says I count the minutes) and custom bike dreaming the winter away. No, I’m not spending as much time in my cold garage working on bikes (it’s cold out there!), but that doesn’t mean I can’t appreciate the work of those that do. Matter of fact, I only encourage them to spend more time out there so I can wile away dark, cold days next winter with exciting new rides to gawk at.
Published in Baggers
   Nothing says Merry Christmas to me like an Old School Panhead and if this was under my tree I’d be the happiest boy that ever lived. From reader response to vintage Harley-Davidsons that tend to show up here with regularity, I’d say most of you feel the same way too. I mean, who wouldn’t get all giggly owning a ride like this, but like a lot of Christmas wishes, that’ll probably all it ever will be ─ a wish. But that doesn’t mean I can’t keep dreaming and neither should you.
Published in Choppers
    The name emblazoned on the side of the tank says it all. This rad bagger is part of a series of Harley-Davidson baggers built by Nick Trask of Trask Performance in Phoenix, Arizona, to showcase his Assault parts line. And, it really assaults every one of your senses from sight (just take a look at it man!) to smell (burnt rubber) to taste (again, burnt rubber) to touch (massive turbo acceleration makes you try to indent the grips with your finger tips and pushes your ass into the seat) to hearing (between the huge turbo and that exhaust pipe which is the equivalent to open mike night at a metal thrash).
Published in Baggers
  There’s an old saying “Nice Guys Finish Last” that may or may not be true in general, but its sure doesn’t apply to the guy who built this Triumph Bonneville custom in the heart of Brooklyn. That it’s actually going to do time on the Bonneville Salt Flats as well as the show circuit and, as the late Rodent always said, “The mean streets of NYC” sure put Steve Iacona of Iacona Custom Cycles in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, New York, in a tough spot. Ah, that’s no problem for him as he’ll just smile, hunker down and figure out the most elegant and reliable way to do it. That’s how Steve rolls.
Published in Racers
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